Lees Court Estate, Faversham
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Latest news from the Lees Court Estate

25 Jan 2019

Shooting Gazette

lees court news

Lees Court is the featured Shoot in the February 2019 edition of the Shooting Gazette.

See 'News and Media' to read the full article

20 Jul 2018

Kent Archaeological Society Bimble

lees court news

The first of the Society 'Bimbles' around Lees Court Estate takes place this coming Saturday, 21st July.  Starting at 11am from the Estate Yard Barn on Sheldwich Lees, this 8-mile walk will help members and non-members of KAS become familiar with the Estate.  The walk will encompass St James' Church, moving to on to Badlesmere Church and the possible location of Der Badlesmere Castle.  During the walk, there will be the opportunity to look at lynchetts and sites of ring ditches, as well as see the spectacular chalkland valley with pyramid orchids and the sites of some of the recently discovered Bronze Aged hoards

17 Jun 2018

Another successful Charity Clay Shoot

lees court news

There was a record attendance at the fourth Annual Charity Clay Shoot took place at Lees Court Estate. The event raised just over £2800 for the two charities nominated charities, The National Gamekeepers Organisation Educational Trust and Bowel Cancer UK.

The winner of the raffle, a Walk Up Day for Two at Lees Court was Mick Leeds from Faversham.

The results of the Clay Shoot:

Juniors: 1st Georgie Smith (54), 2nd Lawrence Tester (50) 3rd Tom Hales and William Kenneth (48)

Ladies: 1st Faye Wells (60) 2nd Steph Harvey (55) 3rd Emma Hogben (50)

Father and Child: 1st Dan and Lawrence Tester (112)

Highest: 1st Bradley Ballentyne (73)  2nd John Webb  and Ben Marsh, 3ed Phil Ham and Daniel Kemsley

 

The event will be taking place again next year, on Fathers'Day  Sunday, 16th June 2019 - we look forward to seeing you all again.

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10 Jun 2018

Annual Charity Clay Shoot

lees court news

In aid of The National Game Keepers Organisation Educational Trust and Bowel Cancer UK

75 Bird Sporting shoot £25

Individual Pool Shoot

Start 10am - Last entry 3.30pm

See diary entry for more information 

01 Aug 2017

How to run a successful shoot

lees court news

The Estate is featured in the CLA Magazine "How to run a shoot".

http://www.cla.org.uk/advice/how-run-successful-commercial-shoot

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The Countryside Code

The Countryside Code is a set of statutory guidelines on the responsibilities for visitors to the countryside and those who manage the land.

Below is a brief summary, the full code can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-countryside-code

Respect the local community and other people using the outdoors. Remember your actions can affect people's lives and livelihoods.

  • Respect the needs of local people and visitors alike – for example, don’t block gateways,driveways or other paths with your vehicle.
  • When riding a bike or driving a vehicle, slow down or stop for horses, walkers and farm animals and give them plenty of room. By law, cyclists must give way to walkers and horseriders on bridleways.
  • Co-operate with people at work in the countryside. For example, keep out of the way when farm animals are being gathered or moved and follow directions from the farmer.
  • Busy traffic on small country roads can be unpleasant and dangerous to local people, visitors and wildlife - so slow down and where possible, leave your vehicle at home.
  • Leave gates and property as you find them and follow paths.
  • A farmer will normally close gates to keep farm animals in, but may sometimes leave them open so the animals can reach food and water. Leave gates as you find them or follow instructions on signs.
  • Follow paths unless wider access is available, such as on open country or registered common land (known as ‘Open Access land’).
  • Leave machinery and farm animals alone – don’t interfere with animals even if you think they’re in distress. Try to alert the farmer instead.
  • Use gates, stiles or gaps in field boundaries if you can – climbing over walls, hedges and fences can damage them and increase the risk of farm animals escaping.
  • Our heritage matters to all of us – be careful not to disturb ruins and historic sites.
  • Leave no trace of your visit and take your litter home. Litter and leftover food doesn’t just spoil the beauty of the countryside, it can be dangerous to wildlife and farm animals. Dropping litter and dumping rubbish are criminal offences.
  • Fires can be as devastating to wildlife and habitats as they are to people and property – so be careful with naked flames and cigarettes at any time of the year. 
  • Keep dogs under effective control, when you take your dog into the outdoors, always ensure it does not disturb wildlife, farm animals, horses or other people by keeping it under effective control. This means that you: keep your dog on a lead, or keep it in sight at all times, be aware of what it’s doing and be confident it will return to you promptly on command and ensure it does not stray off the path or area where you have a right of access
  • It’s always good practice (and a legal requirement on ‘Open Access’ land) to keep your dog on a lead around farm animals and horses, for your own safety and for the welfare of the animals. A farmer may shoot a dog which is attacking or chasing farm animals without being liable to compensate the dog’s owner.
  • However, if cattle or horses chase you and your dog, it is safer to let your dog off the lead.
  • Always clean up after your dog and get rid of the mess responsibly –‘ bag it and bin it’.